All posts tagged: Modesty

MODEST ELEGANCE

Article for FashionMoodz Modest Elegance You may have come across the terminology ‘modesty’ or ‘modest fashion’. You probably have seen glimpses of articles mentioning the new boom of modest fashion. However, you may not have paid too much attention to it, as it’s generally used for a niche group of women within certain cultures and religions. This is where the origins and importance of modesty gets diluted; tying it to a specific group of people only. Though the word modesty can be used in different context, let’s look at it from a fashion’s perspective. Read more on here.

CONSCIOUS CONSUMPTION

For Amaliah.com  Conscious Consumption: I Shop, Therefore I Am The number of people within the Muslim communities loving fashion has visibly increased over the past decade. Modesty fashion is an ongoing movement that has been picked up online in the late 2008s. More young girls and women are using fashion as a means to demonstrate their Muslim identity. It’s something celebratory, having the freedom to express oneself through the means of fashion. What is concerning, however, is the increase of compulsive consumption. Read more on here.  Words | Zinah Nur Sharif Photography | Rongji Sun & Zinah Nur Sharif

DIFFERENT DIRECTION

I’ve started blogging at the age of 21 in 2010, utilising blogger.com as a platform to showcase my creativity. The intentions were to merely show what I love, what relates to my lifestyle as a muslim woman and how I dress. There wasn’t a masterplan behind it, I didn’t think much of it. I was in my second year of university doing my bachelors degree. Somehow, two years later, it became bigger than I have anticipated, took a direction that seemed accidental and coincidental rather than planned. I kept going with it, as I was exploring possibilities of what I would like to do career wise. I enjoyed doing editorials, I had a thrill of meeting new people, I have discovered new communities and I made new friends. It was all exciting…until it wasn’t. Up until 2014, I’ve been consistent, I decided to create a self-named label and focus more on that. I’m sure we’ve all been at a place where we thought we had a passion for something. That was my place then, I …

HEADSCARVES AND HYMENS

For Amaliah.com Book Review: ‘Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution’ by Mona Eltahawy Abstract: I was meant to read this book as part of my master’s dissertation in 2016. Somehow, I didn’t have the heart to face what I assumed to be an anti-headscarf book. I completed my dissertation and didn’t have the courage to even open it once. Two years later, I went out of my way to purchase the book; consciously spontaneous but subconsciously always in my mind. Read more on here. Styling and Words | Zinah Nur Sharif Photography | Ty Faruki Makeup | Safiyah M Model | Olivia Ancell (Body London)

REMOVING THE HIJAB

For Huffington Post UK Removing The Hijab Doesn’t Make You A Bad Muslim Abstract: Who could have ever imagined that a piece of cloth could uphold such significant power? We are used to connecting the headscarf with religious obligation, so it only seems logical to think of religion presiding over how Muslim women should dress. However, only some focus on the political, social and cultural influence it conveys. Read more on here.  Styling and Words | Zinah Nur Sharif Photography | Ty Faruki Makeup | Safiyah M Model | Simona Bajorinaite

THE TELEGRAPH FILM

This was a collaborative work with The Telegraph, unveiling the subject of Modest Fashion in a video format. My monologue can be seen in the first half of the film. Meet the influencers bringing modest fashion to the mainstream MODEST FASHION from Emma Nichols on Vimeo. From high-end designers to bloggers and vloggers, in this film, we speak to the influencers who are presenting modest-inspired clothing such as the hijab, the abaya, the burka and the burkini in a new and exciting light. With designer fashion houses including Dolce & Gabbana and DKNY and high street staples Zara and Mango all releasing bespoke modest fashion collections, the integration of the movement into the mainstream is opening doors for leading innovators in the industry. More on telegraph.co.uk  

FREYA MAGAZINE

To Veil Growing up in a European village where I naturally stood out due to my race, people treated me differently and saw me differently. Somehow in their ignorant minds, they could not grasp that there are different races in this colourful world and it bewildered them even more when I started wearing the hijab. It was quiet an experience having to face those kind of people, being asked questions I myself didn’t have answers to back then, getting teased by school kids and starred at by strangers. I knew I was different due to my appearance, but I never understood how I was made to feel different due to my character and personality, when in reality I was just like any other average kid. It vexed me how people had the sense to prejudge me due to a piece of cloth before I even opened my mouth. Of course, in due time I have learned that the hijab is more than a mere piece of cloth; it carries symbolism of religion, culture and even …

THE SUNDAY TIMES

This was an article for the Sunday Times Style magazine, where I was interviewed to comment on beauty and hijab. The Modesty Maze Some of the best beauty blogs are by Muslim women. We ask how they reconcile make-up and the hijab Muslim beauty blogs are on the rise, their posts tackling, among other things, how young British Muslim women reconcile wearing the hijab, or headscarf, with beauty and cosmetics. “I find it confusing,” says the Muslim comedian Shazia Mirza, who doesn’t wear a hijab. “How can women cover their hair as a sign of modesty and then plaster their face in make-up? You’re either modest or you’re Rihanna. You can’t have it both ways.” Read more on here. Words | Zinah Nur Sharif Photography | Zakaria Nur Sharif

MARIE CLAIRE INTERVIEW

For Marie Claire April 2015 print issue (now also on the website)  Blending fashion, faith and feminism in empowering new ways, meet the women redefining their religions for a new generation Abstract: Religion is in rapid decline among young people, with only 25 per cent of 16-24-year-olds in Britain saying they believe in God. But millennials of different faiths are galvanising the need for cultural innovation, to ensure their religions remain relevant in an ever-changing world by redefining their religions. There are pop-up kosher restaurants like London’s Kosher Roast, and the ‘Mipsterz’ movement – ‘hipster Muslims’ using make-up and accessories to challenge the view that the hijab is a symbol of oppression. Elsewhere, style blogs including Hijab Style, Muslimah Beauty, Church Girl Chic and Jewish blog Fabologie offer tips on how to conform to modesty with style – and they are attracting thousands of hits every week. Read more here